Tuesday, October 05, 2010

A beautiful afternoon on the Union Terrace: Where Is everybody?

A Beautiful Afternoon on the Union Terrace: Where Is Everybody?
It wasn't exactly deserted, but I was surprised there weren't more people on the Union Terrace yesterday, a gorgeous autumn afternoon. I remember when the only time you could get photographs of the brightly colored sunburst chairs and tables without people was on a cold, overcast or rainy day. Not so yesterday.

DSCN0310-TableShadow2-smWhere is everybody? Have they bought their own chairs to enjoy in their backyards and patios? Or are we all spending so much time online and in the virtual world that being outdoors in the real world, sitting on the Terrace and gazing out at Lake Mendota, has lost its appeal? Has basking in the sun's carcinogenic rays come to be seen as too dangerous? Or has its glare become just too distracting for people tethered to mobile devices, making it too hard to Tweet or update their Facebook status? Will the future of humanity be found in the shadows? Just wondering.

2 comments:

Leslie F. Miller said...

That is pretty spooky, but since I got a bunch of solo chair shots during a HUGE crush of people, I know you could've done the same. But you wouldn't have.

So it's too cold. They're all wusses. That's all there is to it. Oh, and the semester is in full force. Surely they're too smart to be on FB and Flickr, like we are.

Joaquin said...

Interesting, but distrubing observation.
I had the same thought when I saw a commercial several months ago about NFL players encouraging kids to spend an hour (1 hour) outside doing some type of activity. 1 hour!
When I was growing up, I had to be dragged home from playing baseball, basketball and whatever else we were doing outside.
Here is the link to Play-60

http://www.nfl.com/news/story?id=09000d5d80b4a489&template=with-video&confirm=true

Right under our noses we are seeing a generation of plugged-in kids with little or no physical activity, little sports camaradery, and diminishing social skills.